So it goes

⚡art history, pop culture, politics, laughing lots, good films & television, men that smell nice, reading science fiction, dogs⚡


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thenightlistener:

Dope
portraits-of-america:

     “I was a freshman in high school and she was in eighth grade when the Beatles hit. There was just something about that time: there was folk music, the Civil Rights Movement, the sexual revolution, Woodstock, the Kingston Trio, the anti-Vietnam War protests, and a lot of excellent live music. Most guys wanted a guitar and to play in a garage band. It was a period of six or seven years that was completely different. I graduated from high school in 1967. The people who graduated just a year before us in 1966 were considered old—a whole different generation!”     “I recently went to our high school reunion. I ran into a guy who had a locker next to me, but we never really talked a lot back then—just ‘hi‘ and ‘how are you’. We sat down and talked for four hours! And he said, ‘You know, I don’t have as much in common with the younger guys I work with, than with you because we went through those times together.’ There’s definitely a connection between the people who grew up during that time. You meet someone, and—without even realizing why—you click right away because of that common experience: the history you share that you don’t have with a lot of others.”     “But I think—I can’t even tell you why, but I feel it—that the group of kids that are just coming in now will be like our generation. They’re not going to care about money as much as education, the person next to them, all the inequalities that exist, and bettering the world.”
 
Green Bay, WI

portraits-of-america:

     “I was a freshman in high school and she was in eighth grade when the Beatles hit. There was just something about that time: there was folk music, the Civil Rights Movement, the sexual revolution, Woodstock, the Kingston Trio, the anti-Vietnam War protests, and a lot of excellent live music. Most guys wanted a guitar and to play in a garage band. It was a period of six or seven years that was completely different. I graduated from high school in 1967. The people who graduated just a year before us in 1966 were considered old—a whole different generation!”
     “I recently went to our high school reunion. I ran into a guy who had a locker next to me, but we never really talked a lot back then—just ‘hi‘ and ‘how are you’. We sat down and talked for four hours! And he said, ‘You know, I don’t have as much in common with the younger guys I work with, than with you because we went through those times together.’ There’s definitely a connection between the people who grew up during that time. You meet someone, and—without even realizing why—you click right away because of that common experience: the history you share that you don’t have with a lot of others.”
     “But I think—I can’t even tell you why, but I feel it—that the group of kids that are just coming in now will be like our generation. They’re not going to care about money as much as education, the person next to them, all the inequalities that exist, and bettering the world.”

 

Green Bay, WI

strangecousinsusanx:

pale-fire:

Feminist Graffiti from the 1970s [x]

I haven’t seen this in a while. It never gets old.

strangecousinsusanx:

pale-fire:

Feminist Graffiti from the 1970s [x]

I haven’t seen this in a while. It never gets old.

(via peachyfvckingkeeen)

unexplained-events:

William Utermohlen
Artist William Utermohlen was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease in 1995. Over the course of roughly five years he drew these self portriats (starting at 1996) of himself.
Whether the cause for the change in his portraits was from the disease which made him forget what he looked like or due to the loss of artistic skills, this is extremely heartbreaking.

unexplained-events:

William Utermohlen

Artist William Utermohlen was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease in 1995. Over the course of roughly five years he drew these self portriats (starting at 1996) of himself.

Whether the cause for the change in his portraits was from the disease which made him forget what he looked like or due to the loss of artistic skills, this is extremely heartbreaking.

(via peachyfvckingkeeen)

vegangains:

Always reblog Elle Woods in her “fuck men I’m gonna get a law degree” phase

vegangains:

Always reblog Elle Woods in her “fuck men I’m gonna get a law degree” phase

(Source: annabelletegan, via lillabet)

fallontonight:

- Jimmy Fallon’s Monologue; September 19, 2014
[ Part 1 / Part 2 ]

fallontonight:

- Jimmy Fallon’s Monologue; September 19, 2014

[ Part 1 / Part 2 ]

lookatthisstory:

Two wars, two veterans, both homeless. Henry Addington, 67, served with the Navy in Vietnam and Dan Martin, 29, was a medic in Afghanistan.

If you ask them, homeless veterans might tell you they only have a vague idea of what they look like, or how they got to where they are. At least that was true of the few we met in San Diego.

There are about 50,000 homeless vets in the U.S., according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Veterans who have struggled with drug use or mental illness, unemployment or criminal records — or any number of things.

NPR spoke with Henry, Dan and 7 other veterans in a pop-up portrait studio at Stand Down San Diego. Find out what they had to say.

(via npr)

chasingthegreenfaerie:

Pin by Stephanie on Art and Illustration | Pinterest on We Heart It.

chasingthegreenfaerie:

Pin by Stephanie on Art and Illustration | Pinterest on We Heart It.

(Source: alexturxer)

snarkydiscolizard:

"i’m sad and idk how to feel better"

image

"i don’t know what to draw"

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"i always mess up"

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"BUT I SUCK"

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(via cheeseburgerqueen)

ratak-monodosico: